Young Women In Bio Seattle Past Events
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WIB-Seattle: YWIB-Seattle at the Fred Hutch for a Look Inside Our Blood!, February 26, 2020

Posted By Brittany Ruhland, Monday, March 16, 2020

For the second year in a row, YWIB-Seattle collaborated with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) for an event titled "Join YWIB-Seattle at the Fred Hutch for a Look Inside Our Blood!" on February 26, 2020. Eleven students from Seattle-area high schools attended to learn about the fascinating and complex components that make up our blood. Dr. Beverly Torok-Storb (FHCRC, Clinical Research Division) introduced students to the concept of adult stem cells, and their immense potential for regeneration therapy. The students looked through many microscopy images of various blood cells to gain a greater understanding of how all these cells work together, and to be able to identify them in their samples later in the lab. While discussing internships for high school students at the FHCRC, Dr. Torok-Storb emphasized the importance of diversity in the biomedical workforce: utilizing everyone's unique perspective means that together we will be able to generate creative research advances even faster.

Click here for more photos.


After learning the necessary background information, students donned the proper safety gear and first demonstrated to themselves the concept of G-force, relevant to the centrifuge they later used. They did this by swinging a bucket of water above their heads, and staying dry because G-forces kept the water inside the bucket. The overall goal of their lab activity was to learn how to make whole-blood and enriched-sample smears on a slide, and image those smears by microscopy after staining. The majority of cells in these smears were red blood cells, but after properly centrifuging their samples of dog blood in a sugar gradient, students were able to enrich for lymphocytes and stain smears of concentrated immune cells present in the blood samples. Dr. Torok-Storb connected observations students made based on their slides, like the presence or absence of lymphocytes in whole-blood smears, to the clinical manifestations of leukemia discussed in her talk. Students were able to see some of the facilities and lab spaces at FHCRC in a tour, while learning what happens in those spaces and how it tied back to the mission of FHCRC.

Tags:  2020 

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WIB-Seattle: Dive into Marine Biology with YWIB-Seattle at the Seattle Aquarium, November 13, 2019

Posted By Brittany Ruhland, Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Seattle headed to the Seattle Aquarium on November 13, 2019. Twenty-two high school students rolled up their sleeves to perform squid dissections and plankton tows, followed by a great career panel with experts in marine biology.

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Students were first able to observe first-hand how the chromatophores of a market squid can change color with applied pressure. After carefully noting how the external features of a squid contribute to its function, students enthusiastically began their dissection under the guidance of a Seattle Aquarium expert. 

After delving into the anatomy of a squid, students turned their attention to the bountiful microorganisms living in Elliot Bay underneath the Seattle Aquarium. Groups of two to three students performed plankton tows off the side of the pier as the sun set behind the Olympic Mountains. Students then searched for zooplankton and phytoplankton using microscopes and identification guides; the occasional excited raised voice let us know when a fast-moving plankton species was spotted! 

Three wonderful panelists from the Seattle Aquarium concluded the evening with a lively discussion of careers in marine biology. Kathryn Kegel (Senior Aquarist), Julie Carpenter (Associate Curator of Birds & Mammals), and Caitlin Hadfield (Senior Veterinarian) spoke about their own educational and professional paths, as well as answering specific questions from students on how to set themselves up for success in marine biology during college. The many and varied student questions ranged from topics of current research going on at the Seattle Aquarium to the best strategies for getting involved in marine conservation. Because marine biology and conservation go hand in hand, the panelists also shared their thoughts on how best to promote inclusion in the field of conservation, and how conservation ties into their own work.

Our YWIB-Seattle team would like to thank the wonderful Seattle Aquarium Connections Program for helping to make this event happen, our fantastic panelists for sharing their advice, and of course, all the students who brought their infectious enthusiasm!


Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: Learn to Code a Talking Robot with Young Women In Bio-Seattle at the Microsoft Store!, September 28, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer, Friday, October 11, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Seattle partnered with the Microsoft Store on September 28, 2019, to host a hands-on introductory coding workshop for middle school and high school students. After learning about the fundamental skills needed to code, students used the “Ohbot The Robot” app to arrange blocks of code that programmed the Ohbot app simulator to move and speak on their tablets. Students received instant feedback from the app simulator, then were able to plug the real-life Ohbot into their tablets and watch their code come to life! The students learned through experience that extreme attention to detail is critical to coding and required in order to sync Ohbot’s lip movements with speech. What was the main takeaway for students after this activity? “I should do more coding because it’s fun!”

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With their newfound appreciation for the basics of coding, the group then heard from Kerry Bosworth (Senior Partner Technical Lead, Microsoft) as she spoke about making a career in the rapidly changing industry of computer science. Bosworth emphasized that the most important skill you can have is problem-solving, and illustrated problem-solving techniques by inviting students to solve several word problems and puzzles as a group. The key to solving a problem, Bosworth said, is having the confidence to slow down and think your way through it: the answer will present itself. She left students with three pieces of advice. First, never stop coding; second, never stop reading; and third, practice public speaking whenever you can.

Overall, this event was a fun, insightful, and fantastic success! Thank you so much to the students who attended, the Microsoft Store for hosting the first YWIB-Seattle event of the 2019-2020 school year, and our fabulous guest speaker Kerry Bosworth.

Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: GET READY TO ROCK! Girls Inc. dig into Geology with the BurkeMobile & Young Women In Bio-Seattle, May 24th, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Monday, August 5, 2019

The Seattle Chapter of Young Women In Bio partnered with the Burke Museum to bring a paleontology-themed event to Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest. This event took place at Seahurst Elementary School in Burien, WA on Friday, May 24th, 2019. 

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The Burke Museum BurkeMobile is a traveling program that brings educational and interactive Mini Museums to schools and communities across Washington State. For this event, twenty Girls Inc. students, grades two through six, participated in the BurkeMobile’s “Dig In!” program. 

The students at this event were immersed in the Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Cenozoic Eras as BurkeMobile educators set up artifacts, facilitated hands-on activities, and answered questions about fossils and paleontology.  After an introduction about geological history from Burke educators and a snack break, the students guided themselves through the exhibits while being encouraged to ask questions. The girls stepped into the boots of a paleontologist and were able to observe and touch fossils, examine specimens under microscopes, interact with a dinosaur thigh bone, and even dig for fossils! Throughout this event, both Burke educators and YWIB-Seattle volunteers helped facilitate this hands-on learning and answered any questions.

As the students moved through the exhibits, one student excitedly announced she was going to be a scientist, and others practiced the scientific behaviors of note-taking and documentation. 

This unique experience brought a Mini Museum to students living far away from the Burke Museum, and everyone had a blast on this exciting journey through geologic time with the BurkeMobile! 

Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: Careers in Biotechnology: (Young Women In Bio) A Panel Event for IATRIX21 Club, January 14, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Tuesday, July 30, 2019

On January 14, 2019, Young Women In Bio-Seattle hosted “Careers in Biotechnology: A Panel Event for IATRIX21 Club” at Mountlake Terrace High School. Thirty students attended to learn more about careers in the field of biotechnology. The panelists were Lauren Ryan (Senior Mechanical Engineer at Microsoft Research), Anna Rashevsky (International Regulatory Affairs Specialist at NanoString Technologies), and Sarah Warren (Director of Advanced Applications at NanoString Technologies).



First, the speakers discussed the formal education and experience required for the panelists’ respective positions. Sarah Warren told students that she loved science because “it’s an opportunity to go out and discover.” She also discussed how a failed entrepreneurial enterprise ultimately formed her future successes. Lauren Ryan spoke about sexism in STEM fields and how the students can overcome this to pursue what they really love to do. Anna spoke about her lifelong love of science and her transition from bench science to regulatory affairs. 

Additionally, the panelists highlighted the importance of mentors. They encouraged the students to expand their definition of a mentor to include their peers, friends, and teachers. They encouraged the students to be bold about approaching potential mentors, as mentors are often enthusiastic about helping those earlier in their careers.


During the Q&A session, students asked about specific challenges the panelists have faced in their careers and if having doubts about one’s career path is normal. Also, the students inquired about the availability of internships for high school students. The panelists noted that these opportunities are limited for high school students, but noted that job shadowing is an excellent way to gain experience and insight into potential careers. All three panelists agreed that pursuing a career in STEM, especially for women, is an exciting path to pursue. 

Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: Young Women In Bio at Lake Forest Park Elementary Science Discovery Night!, May 15, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Seattle had a blast attending the Lake Forest Park Elementary Science Discovery Night on May 15, 2019. Students learned about the DNA structure through our hands-on activity. Marshmallows served as the chemical bases (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine), which form base pairs and connect to the sugar-phosphate backbone (Twizzlers). 

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Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: Young Women In Bio at Mount Vernon High School Science Night, April 25, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer, Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Seattle participated in the Mount Vernon High School Science Night on April 25, 2019. YWIB-Seattle volunteers engaged parents and students with a hands-on Marshmallow DNA exhibit. Each student received different color marshmallows, representing the four DNA base pairs (Adenine = green, Thymine = pink, Cytosine  = yellow, and Guanine = orange), as well as Twizzlers that represented the sugar phosphate backbone.



After learning about the structure of DNA and the rules of DNA base pairing, the students were able to take home their edible DNA structure.

Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: Young Women In Bio at Cascadia Elementary Science & Engineering Night, April 25, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Friday, May 17, 2019
For the third consecutive year, Young Women In Bio–Seattle hosted a table at Cascadia Elementary Science & Engineering Night on April 25th, 2019. Cascadia Elementary Science & Engineering Night gives students the opportunity to present their science projects and allows students and their families to participate in hands-on science activities.
 
YWIB-Seattle used oobleck (a mixture of cornstarch and water) to demonstrate Non-Newtonian fluids. By making their own mixtures, students experienced first-hand that oobleck mimics a liquid when a weak force is applied, and it mimics a solid when a strong force is applied. Overall, this outreach event was a blast for all involved!

Tags:  2019 

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WIB-Seattle: YWIB-Seattle: "What's Inside Our Blood? A Hands-On Hematopoiesis Lab", March 13, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer, Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Young Women In Bio - Seattle hosted “What’s Inside Our Blood? A Hands-On Hematopoiesis Lab” at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute (FHCRC) on March 13th, 2019. Ten students from high schools around the Seattle area attended to learn about the components of our blood and how those components are changed in a cancerous state. Dr. Beverly Torok-Storb (FHCRC, Clinical Research Division) first introduced students to the concept of stem cells, and their immense potential for regeneration therapy. She then walked students through the typical cell types present in blood, and how leukemia affects those cells. While discussing internships for high school students at the FHCRC, Dr. Torok-Storb emphasized the importance of diversity in the biomedical workforce: utilizing everyone’s unique perspective means that together we will be able to generate creative research advances even faster.

Click here for more photos

 After learning the necessary background information, students moved into the laboratory and donned lab coats, gloves, and goggles. The first goal of the lab activity was to learn how to make a whole-blood smear on a slide, and image that smear by microscopy after staining. The majority of cells in these smears were red blood cells, but after properly centrifuging their samples of dog blood in a sugar gradient, students were able to isolate lymphocytes and stain smears of concentrated immune cells present in the blood samples. Dr. Torok-Storb connected observations students made based on their slides, like the presence or absence of lymphocytes in whole-blood smears, to the clinical manifestations of leukemia discussed in her talk. The event ended with a tour of the shared resources facility in the FHCRC, where students observed scientists at work performing electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and genomics.

Click here for more photos

Tags:  2019 

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Previous Past Events

Posted By Marsha Morgenstern, Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Click here for Young Women In Bio Seattle 2018 Past Events

Click here for Young Women In Bio Seattle 2017 Past Events

Tags:  2017  2018 

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