Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
YWIB Past Events
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: 2019  RTP  San Francisco  Atlanta  Seattle  New York  Capital Region  2018  Montreal  2015  2016  2017  Greater Boston  Philadelphia  YWIB 

WIB-Atlanta: YWIB-Atlanta at Saint Philip AME STEMS Fair as Exhibitor, August 24, 2019

Posted By Dan Cui, Wednesday, August 28, 2019

YWIB-Atlanta attended the 12th annual Saint Philip AME Church’s STEMS Career Fair (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math & Service) as an exhibitor.  The 11 YWIB volunteers had a great time meeting roughly 100 families while showcasing two demonstrations corresponding to famous women in science. The demonstrations included flower dissection for Maria Silbylla Merian and strawberry DNA extraction for Rosalind Franklin.


The purpose of this fair is to expose K-12 students to S.T.E.M. careers through hands-on activities with professionals in science, engineering, and math, as well as a variety of technical careers.  St. Philip’s Resource Ministry is working to make sure middle and high school students are exposed to careers to encourage their interest in pursuing S.T.E.M. opportunities. 

Backpacks with school supplies are given to all registered students and free workshops on college planning and financial aid are available for parents.

YWIB-Atlanta is proud to be a part of this annual event.

Tags:  2019  Atlanta 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-RTP: Young Women In Bio Tour of Duke University’s Regenerative Medicine Labs, July 27, 2019

Posted By Kaitlyn Bacon, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

On July 27, labs from the Duke University Regeneration Next initiative hosted 33 participants from Young Women In Bio RTP. The Regeneration Next Initiative brings together researchers from across Duke’s campus that focus on regeneration research for basic science, engineering, and clinical applications. Many of the labs study regeneration in different model organisms. In each lab, the girls learned how different model organisms can be used to gain insight into human disease and biological function. The girls were able to visit five different labs during their visit, including the Sherwood, Fox, Poss, Capel, and Bursac labs. 

Click here for more photos 

The Sherwood lab uses the model organism C.elegans, a type of nematode, in their research to study cancer and tissue remodeling as well as stem cell interactions. When visiting the Sherwood Lab, the girls were given a brief lesson on C.elegan biology by Dr.Sherwood and then had the opportunity to look at C.elegans under the microscope. The girls learned how green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be used in imaging as a marker for specific cell types or a reporter for gene expression. 

The Fox lab studies Drosophila (fruit flies) to understand tissue repair mechanisms. The girls got hands-on experience looking at Drosophila under the microscope and describing the physical features they saw. The girls began by differentiating between female and male flies. The tip of male flies is dark and rounded while females have a light-colored, pointed tip. After, they moved on to find flies exhibiting other common physical traits. Next, the girls were challenged to use Mendelian genetics to find flies to mate that would result in specific genetic traits. This activity helped the girls learn how traits are inherited from one generation to the next. 

The Poss lab uses zebrafish to study morphogenesis and injury-induced regeneration of several tissues. In the Poss lab, the girls were able to observe Zebrafish in their tank and compared the physical differences between the fish. They learned how Zebrafish can be genetically manipulated to study different biological functions. The girls were also able to use a microscope to look at Zebrafish under the microscope, looking specifically at heart function. 

The Capel Lab studies turtles and mice to understand sex determination and organogenesis as well as cell differentiation. The girls were able to look at turtle embryos that were recovered from eggs at different stages of development and began to understand what causes turtles to be male or female. They also looked at organ tissue at different stages of development under the microscope. The graduate students from this lab also provided a great overview of what it means to be a female scientist! 

The Bursac lab studies cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue engineering therapies as well as the differentiation of stem cells into striated muscle cells. The girls were provided an overview of how the heart works and what can be done to repair damage to the heart. The graduate students shared how they are trying to develop a cellular-based patch that can be put on damaged areas of the heart to restart cell growth in damaged areas. The girls were able to look at cardiac cells the lab had grown by differentiating stem cells. The girls really enjoyed observing the cells beat like a real heart! 

We would like to thank all of the labs for taking time out of their schedules to plan and host very informative tours of their labs. Special thanks to Amy Dickson for helping planning this event and recruiting labs to join the event. 

Tags:  2019  RTP 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-Seattle: GET READY TO ROCK! Girls Inc. Dig Into Geology with the BurkeMobile & Young Women In Bio-Seattle, May 24th, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Monday, August 5, 2019

The Seattle Chapter of Young Women In Bio partnered with the Burke Museum to bring a paleontology-themed event to Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest. This event took place at Seahurst Elementary School in Burien, WA on Friday, May 24th, 2019. 

Click here to see more photos  

The Burke Museum BurkeMobile is a traveling program that brings educational and interactive Mini Museums to schools and communities across Washington State. For this event, twenty Girls Inc. students, grades two through six, participated in the BurkeMobile’s “Dig In!” program. 

The students at this event were immersed in the Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Cenozoic Eras as BurkeMobile educators set up artifacts, facilitated hands-on activities, and answered questions about fossils and paleontology.  After an introduction about geological history from Burke educators and a snack break, the students guided themselves through the exhibits while being encouraged to ask questions. The girls stepped into the boots of a paleontologist and were able to observe and touch fossils, examine specimens under microscopes, interact with a dinosaur thigh bone, and even dig for fossils! Throughout this event, both Burke educators and YWIB-Seattle volunteers helped facilitate this hands-on learning and answered any questions.

As the students moved through the exhibits, one student excitedly announced she was going to be a scientist, and others practiced the scientific behaviors of note-taking and documentation. 

This unique experience brought a Mini Museum to students living far away from the Burke Museum, and everyone had a blast on this exciting journey through geologic time with the BurkeMobile! 

Tags:  2019  Seattle 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-Seattle: Careers in Biotechnology: (Young Women In Bio) A Panel Event for IATRIX21 Club, January 14, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Tuesday, July 30, 2019

On January 14, 2019, Young Women In Bio-Seattle hosted “Careers in Biotechnology: A Panel Event for IATRIX21 Club” at Mountlake Terrace High School. Thirty students attended to learn more about careers in the field of biotechnology. The panelists were Lauren Ryan (Senior Mechanical Engineer at Microsoft Research), Anna Rashevsky (International Regulatory Affairs Specialist at NanoString Technologies), and Sarah Warren (Director of Advanced Applications at NanoString Technologies).



First, the speakers discussed the formal education and experience required for the panelists’ respective positions. Sarah Warren told students that she loved science because “it’s an opportunity to go out and discover.” She also discussed how a failed entrepreneurial enterprise ultimately formed her future successes. Lauren Ryan spoke about sexism in STEM fields and how the students can overcome this to pursue what they really love to do. Anna spoke about her lifelong love of science and her transition from bench science to regulatory affairs. 

Additionally, the panelists highlighted the importance of mentors. They encouraged the students to expand their definition of a mentor to include their peers, friends, and teachers. They encouraged the students to be bold about approaching potential mentors, as mentors are often enthusiastic about helping those earlier in their careers.


During the Q&A session, students asked about specific challenges the panelists have faced in their careers and if having doubts about one’s career path is normal. Also, the students inquired about the availability of internships for high school students. The panelists noted that these opportunities are limited for high school students, but noted that job shadowing is an excellent way to gain experience and insight into potential careers. All three panelists agreed that pursuing a career in STEM, especially for women, is an exciting path to pursue. 

Tags:  2019  Seattle 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-Seattle: Young Women In Bio at Lake Forest Park Elementary Science Discovery Night!, May 15, 2019

Posted By Lauren Metoyer , Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Seattle had a blast attending the Lake Forest Park Elementary Science Discovery Night on May 15, 2019. Students learned about the DNA structure through our hands-on activity. Marshmallows served as the chemical bases (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine), which form base pairs and connect to the sugar-phosphate backbone (Twizzlers). 

Click here for more photos 


Tags:  2019  Seattle 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-RTP: Young Women In Bio RTP Visit to the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, June 12, 2019

Posted By Kaitlyn Bacon, Thursday, July 11, 2019

Young Women In Bio RTP visited the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) on the afternoon of June 12, 2019, to learn more about how we can better treat or prevent human disease. Twenty girls and their guardians received a tour of the NIEHS lab areas and listened to a presentation to learn how environmental factors, like pollutants, can affect human health. The highlight of the afternoon was a panel discussion with female scientists that work at NIEHS. The girls asked lots of questions about the scientist’s daily work and how they became interested in working in STEM. The scientists’ work branched many fields, including immunohistochemistry, environmental epigenomics, toxicology, and clinical research, so the girls learned about many different biology and environmental science fields. 

Click here for more photos 

An ongoing NIEHS study that captivated the girls' interest was the Sister Study. From 2003-2009, more than 50,000 women from across the United States and Puerto Rico were recruited for this study to uncover the cause of breast cancer. All participants had a sister who previously had breast cancer. Researchers hypothesized that by studying sisters they had a higher probability of identifying risk factors of breast cancer as sisters will have had shared environments, genes, and experiences. The Sister Study continues to track the health and lifestyle of participants each year. The knowledge gained from the Sister Study will help people to better understand both the genetic and environmental causes of breast cancer and will be used in the future to develop recommendations for preventing breast cancer. 

Special thanks to John Schelp for coordinating our visit as well as Michelle Campbell, Cindy Innes, Yvette LeGrande, and Kyla Taylor for sharing their experiences as female scientists! 

Tags:  2019  RTP 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-San Francisco Bay Area: Young Women In Bio at the WiSE Fair at the Athenian School in Danville, CA, May 24, 2019

Posted By Leah Makley, Sarah Odeh, and Barbara Troupin , Wednesday, June 5, 2019

On May 24th, YWIB-San Francisco Bay Area volunteers participated in the Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) Fair at the Athenian School in Danville, CA. This annual, student-organized event encourages students’ interest in STEM fields through a series of booths with hands-on science and engineering activities, a keynote speaker, and a panel discussion from women working in STEM fields.

 

YWIB had a hands-on activity booth with three different activities. Attendees worked with volunteers to build edible models of DNA, using different colors of candies to represent different nucleotide bases and licorice ropes to represent a double helical backbone. This activity was meant to illustrate base pairing and the structure of DNA, and it was a big hit with the younger attendees. A second activity illustrated chemical polymerization, using Borax and glue to create bouncy balls, which was fun for both the students and their parents. Lastly, students watched the change in color of solutions containing a pH-sensitive universal indicator as a response to their exhaled breaths. The exhaled carbon dioxide slightly lowers the pH of the solution, causing the color change. 

 

While making bouncy balls or models of DNA, several students also took the opportunity to interact with the YWIB volunteers and get to know them. The students asked thoughtful questions about careers in science, practiced their networking skills, and asked for advice on choosing college majors and even graduate degrees.

 

The hands-on activities were followed by a keynote address given by Bindu Garapaty of Gilead Sciences, and a panel discussion in which five Bay Area women, including Barbara Troupin, MD, MBA, CMO at ERX Pharmaceuticals and YWIB-SF co-chair, shared insights on their career trajectory and experiences. Both the keynote speaker and the panel members spoke to the importance of mentorship, challenges and disparities women may face in the workplace, and advice on how to navigate difficult situations.

 

YWIB looks forward to participating in the WiSE Fair again in future years!

Tags:  2019  San Francisco 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-San Francisco: Young Women In Bio - "How to Get into the Brain” - The Science behind Antibody Engineering and Design, April 18, 2019

Posted By Karen Ring and Jennifer Kim , Thursday, May 30, 2019

On April 18, 2019, the San Francisco Bay Area YWIB chapter (led by Jennifer Kim and Yasmin Chandrasekher) hosted an event at Genentech in South San Francisco titled “How to Get into the Brain - The Science Behind Antibody Engineering.” About 40 high school students from all over the Bay Area were in attendance. The event kicked off with an icebreaker where YWIB volunteers walked students through an exercise where they learned about bispecific antibodies and how scientists are using them to develop medicines that can cross the blood brain barrier and be delivered to the brain. The exercise was followed by two brief presentations by Genentech scientists on their protein purification protocols and the applications of these proteins in targeting neurodegenerative diseases. The students also got a tour of the pilot purification plant and the Genentech campus. The event concluded with a panel discussion featuring 10 Genentech employees. They discussed their career paths and gave students advice on how to pursue careers in STEM through internship opportunities, being persistent and staying curious.

“I really enjoyed the Q&A panel and hearing the panelists’ stories helped me realize that there’s not just one set path. I want to start exploring more while I’m still in high school.” - Tina

Tara, a high school senior interested and curious about different areas of science, especially enjoyed the lab tours and getting to learn about the different things that go on in a research lab.

Tags:  2019  San Francisco 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-Metro New York: A New Cohort of Eager Future MDs Begins the 5th annual Weill-Cornell Medicine Mentorship Program, May 21, 2019

Posted By Wendy Diller , Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Young Women In Bio-Metro New York's mentorship program with Weill Cornell Medicine, now in its fifth year, got off to a roaring start on 5/21, thanks to WCM medical school student-mentors, led by Emily Lang and Elora Busa. A new cohort of nearly 30 NYC high school girls interested in medicine as a career and a new group of WCM first-year medical school student-volunteers met for the first of three sessions, with two more to follow in Fall 2019 and Winter 2020. This month's meeting centered on case studies, similar to those provided to real-life medical school students. Several dozen girls applied to the program, which has a simple application process that is open to both public and private school students. New mentees come from a diverse group of schools in Manhattan and Brooklyn, and we encourage more to apply next year: The application process begins in March 2020.


Click here for more photos 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIB-New York: Young Women In Bio - RockEDU's Science Outreach Lab Welcomes EastSide Community High Schoolers, May 14, 2019

Posted By Wendy Diller, Tuesday, May 28, 2019
May is AP exam and end-of-school-year activities for high schoolers in New York City and elsewhere, but that didn't stop about 25 girls interested in STEM careers from attending RockEDU's PCR Lab Experience on May 14. The girls attend the East Side Community High School in Manhattan. They participated in hands-on demos at Rockefeller University's state-of-the-art outreach labs, around lab methods for isolating DNA. Expert scientists from the outreach lab led discussions around the ethics of DNA testing. Huntington's disease was used as an example and the girls got to practice gel electrophoresis with Huntington's model gel. A very exciting program, at a busy time of year for high school students!

Tags:  2019  New York 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 4
1  |  2  |  3  |  4